Archive for the ‘Meta-Issues, Real Life, Out of Character, Etc.’ Category

17
Oct

Esme give Mad God’s Muse 4 stars!

   Posted by: amrath

If you don’t know who Esme is, she’s the blogger who set herself the epic task last year of reading 100 of SPFBO3’s entries, and subsequently landed a spot as a judge this year. She’s also contributed greatly to the indie community in terms of setting up TBRindr, a service for matching indie authors and reviewers. So support her. She’s awesome.

MGM made her ‘recommended’ numbers and squeaked out a 4 or 5 stars (3.9 rounded up).

I really love how much Esme hates Kariana. I always knew she would be a polarizing character, so it’s great to see different reactions to her.

This pic is from a photographer friend of mine, Sketch Ditty. It wasn’t intended to be Kariana, but I was so struck by it when I saw it that I often show it to people as my visual for the character.

25
Sep

WGW Delay until End of Year

   Posted by: amrath

Sadly, I am looking at not being able to deliver the finale book until the end of the year. My previous editor was unable to complete the project due to a family tragedy, so I had to find another editor to work with, and I am not his only client. We will be going through all three books over the next month or so, and hopefully I can get everything integrated in time for Christmas.

I want to emphasize here: the book is done, at least as far as the story goes. It’s just a matter of polishing it for release, now.

4
Sep

Still waiting on “The War God’s Will”

   Posted by: amrath

Well, it’s September, so I have obviously missed the deadline. The book is done, but it is still in editing. I had expected it back sooner, but the editor is running a little behind, so I am just waiting on that. Hopefully this month!

31
Aug

“The Beyond” was not so good

   Posted by: amrath

Okay, so I watched “The Beyond”, and it kind of sucked. For a while it was tolerable, but the end was just so bad that it ruined the whole experience.

It’s told in a documentary format, so it’s slow paced, but that’s fine. I am not one of those who needs high action, and this movie has basically none. But I AM one who needs his science in science fiction movies to make some sort of sense, and the science in the end is absolutely dreadful.

So is the storytelling. It seems like about ten minutes of footage is simply missing, leading to the climactic moment of the movie not only not making any sense (a threat appears from nowhere, is not explained, and without any leadup whatsoever, though the characters behave as if they have known about it for some time) but never being explained at all, even in retrospect.

And seriously, what is up with the grammar? “Complexing” instead of “perplexing”? (Several times, this word was used, and it caused me pain each instance.) Is that a euro thing, or did they just utterly fail? “Rised” instead of “rose”? Could that have been a character affectation? Living forever is “IMmortal”, not “mortal”, and no way can that one be explained.

Kind of 1st year film student, without the obligatory overdone trope inversions and inappropriate background music, so there were a few positives.

2 of 5 stars.

I am going to admit something very geeky about  myself. I often have these little scenarios play through my head where I wonder what would happen if you pitted one mythical or fictional creature against another. How does a pack of werewolves fare in the zombie apocalypse? Could Conan beat Darth Vader in a sword fight? How would Roland fare against either of them? Yeah, I have precious little free time, and this is what I do with it, folks.

So while it’s not my normal thing by a long shot, “I Was a Teenage Weredeer” by Charles Phipps and Michael Suttkus is a mythical and pop-culture mashup that hit my sense of the strange and humorous right where I needed it. After grueling days of code-slinging and bug fixing, I was really ready for something lighter for a change, and this one fit the bill.

How to describe it? In a mixing bowl, combine equal parts “Buffy the Vampire Slayer”, “True Blood”, and “Twin Peaks”. Mix thoroughly, and garnish liberally with puns, and you’ll have something a lot like “I Was a Teenage Weredeer.”

Jane Doe (Yes, it starts right in on the puns) has just turned 18. Also, she is a weredeer, but that’s not what’s important. What’s important is that she identifies as a Baratheon, and her werewolf best friend Emma is team Stark.  Oh, and her brother, who is not a weredeer or were-anything-else, has just been collared for the murder of Emma’s sister.

Thus begins a pun and popculture filled trip into a world where disliking vampires and werewolves is “kinda racist”, and solving mysteries might require a literal trip to Hell and back. Armed with a big mouth and little control over what comes out of it, and the ability to read impressions from objects, Jane is ready for action to prove her brother innocent.

He is innocent, right? As she uncovers the seamy side of what she assumed to be an idyllic refuge for werefolk, she begins to have her doubts, and not just about her brother.

A lot of what makes “Weredeer” really cute are the cameos and tips of the hat to other media, so I’ll not go into that deeply, but lets just say you could make an unwinnable drinking game out of this book.

One caveat. Despite what you might think, this is not really a Young Adult book. It seems like it is, but as I mentioned, there is a fairly seamy side to this tale, so if one is expecting kid-friendly, it ain’t. (Yes, it’s ok to say “ain’t”  when you’re making a point. Tell them I said so.)

5 of 5. I’ll have the cherry pie, please.

 

25
Jul

“War God’s Will” is now in editing

   Posted by: amrath

Sent the manuscript to the editor Monday night.

 

17
Jul

“The War God’s Will” is finished

   Posted by: amrath

I just wrapped up the second pass tonight. I intend to take a third, but I don’t expect it to be much longer than a week, and then I’ll get the manuscript to my editor.

W00t! Arc 1 complete.

 

22
Jun

“Where Loyalties Lie” by Rob J Hayes

   Posted by: amrath


Let me start by saying that as a former member of the US Navy, I have strong opinions on pirates. No, I have never actually dealt with any, but that is because those who served before me held the same views I do. The notable lack of pirates in our modern world (with a few exceptions) strongly influenced my adopting of said philosophy, which is: pirates have their proper place, and that place is hanging from the yard arms, working on a proper form of rigor mortis and having their dead eyes properly pecked by seagulls.

Yes, that’s right. Not only do pirate lives not matter, they are actually of negative value. The world is a better place for each filthy, scurvy, peg-legged, eye-patched miscreant sent to Davy Jones, preferably by way of a cat-o-nine and then being drug along the keel or processed through the bowels of sharks.

I know, I know, “Tell us how you really feel, Matt!”

That being said, fantasy pirates can be rip roaring fun, and Rob Hayes has achieved that in spades with “Where Loyalties Lie”. Since I started reading this book, Mark Lawrence’s Self-Published Fantasy Blog Off for 2017 has wrapped up, and Rob has managed to win the thing, and it’s a well-deserved victory. “Where Loyalties Lie” is well written, damned entertaining, and (as a former sailor, I really appreciate this part) won Esme’s coveted “Most F-bomb’s given”. How can you not go for that? As Hammerlock says in Borderlands 2, “Would you like to do battle with a midget riding piggyback on a bullymong? If the answer is yes, please proceed to the Southern Shelf and defeat Midge-Mong for me. If the answer is no, you are sad, and I’ve no desire to speak with you further.” Well, after you switch the midget and bullymong with F-Bombs and Pirates.

You know what I mean.

The Five Kingdoms are sending their navy to Kill All Pirates™, a perfectly understandable, reasonable goal, unless one happens to be a pirate. In that case, it’s a big problem.

Drake Morass is a conniving, back-stabbing, but happy-go-lucky fellow who wants to get drunk, laid, and become King of the Pirates. He plans to make lemons from lemonade, and use the attacks from the Five Kingdoms to rally the buccaneers and their folks under his banner, but he can’t do it alone. He knows he will need Keelin Stillwater.

Stillwater is something of a nice-guy pirate who rocks double cutlasses of ass-kicking, but only murders folk now and then. He also has a terrible problem choosing women, but that’s practically a requirement for the job.

Both of these guys have some big secrets, some big plans, and the common sense not to trust one another, but they are united in their fear and loathing of the Five Kindoms.

Well, and also Tanner Black. He’s a very UN-nice guy. In fact, he’s the poster child for my above stated position on pirates, yardarms, and rigor mortis.  I would note, for the record, that most people in this novel share my opinion on pirates as applied to Captain Black.

It’s a really fun tale, with lots of intrigue, and a surprising amount of humor considering it falls within the grimdark genre. One of my favorite, laugh out loud moments was Drake, in a very bad spot, screaming an incoherent, rambling stream-of-consciousness rant of curses, some of which he was making up on the spot. I literally had to call my wife in and read it to her because It Had to be Shared.

Five of five, would read again. I’d give bonus points for the creative cursing (I did mention I was a sailor in another life, right? I appreciate a fine curse as much as a fine whiskey) but this ain’t Spinal Tap, and five is the max.

Go buy it. You know you want to.

 

15
Mar

WGW draft is done

   Posted by: amrath

First draft of “The War God’s Will” is finished. Now to make it pretty!

 

12
Feb

“Art of War” anthology

   Posted by: amrath

 

Art of War: Anthology for Charity

Art of War: Anthology for Charity

I was fortunate enough to receive an advance copy of this anthology. It’s edited by Petros Triantafyllou of Booknest, and contains forty dark and bloody tales of war from an outstanding field of authors. The proceeds are to be donated to Doctors Without Borders, so you can get your grimdark war fix and actually contribute to some good in the world!

I don’t get a lot of time to read. Between five kids, a full time day job, trying to finish my novels, working on my adventure gfx game engine, and church, I barely have a spare moment. I seriously read just a few pages in the evenings before bed, and it takes me ages to finish anything. I had forgotten how much I liked short stories, because they fit into my schedule better. I can usually finish one in a single sitting. It’s a shame the art form isn’t more popular.

That’s how I slowly worked my way through Art of War, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. As with any anthology, there were stories that really resonated with me, and a few that didn’t grab me. All of the stories were at least ‘ not bad’, but a few left deep impressions.

My favorite was “This War of Ours” by Timandra Whitecastle, a surreal tale of a desperate conflict between forest creatures that reminds one of children’s fables. Imagine the characters from Henny Penny or the Fox and the Grapes taking up weapons of war and destructive magic and going at one another in an organized manner, with all the fear, pain, and misery that entails. I highly recommend it.

I also especially liked “The Hero of Aral Pass” by Mark Lawrence; “The Best and Bravest” by M.L. Spencer, “The Two Faces of War” by Rob Hayes, “Warborn” by C.T. Phipps, “Valkyrie Rain” by Dyrk Ashton, and “The Cost of Power” by Ulff Lehmann.

Overall, 4/5, well worth the price, and you’re helping a worthy charity. And people say grimdark is all grim and dark….

 

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